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Written by John P. McLaughlin

From the Album: Just a Little Rain

Ste Anne de Bellevue, Ste Anne de Bellevue
I lived long ago in Ste Anne de Bellevue
Old houses of stone beneath scotch pine and birch
Nestled like toys ’round an old parish church
Where the snow falls like cotten the long evening through
And lays quiet as sleep in Ste Anne de Bellevue

Ste Anne de Bellevue, Ste Anne de Bellevue
I kissed a boy in Ste Anne de Bellevue
We were just cousins behind the coats
By a hot radiator where the wet mittens smoked
He gave me his brown eyes and said I love you
And the world stopped right there in Ste Anne de Bellevue

Ste Anne de Bellevue, Ste Anne de Bellevue
One April I left my Ste Anne de Bellevue
There was sand in the streets and the lilac was out
And I went off to find I’ve forgotten what now
But if you ever go back, please remember me to
The girl I once was and Ste Anne de Bellevue

Ste Anne de Bellevue, Ste Anne de Bellevue
I lived long ago in Ste Anne de Bellevue
Old houses of stone beneath scotch pine and birch
Nestled like toys ’round an old fashioned church
And if you ever go back, please remember me to
The girl I once was and Ste Anne de Bellevue

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2 comments:

Sheila CooperDecember 19, 2016 at 8:22 pmReply

I lived in Pointe Claire growing up now on the west coast but I spent much time in Ste Anne’s and love the memories! Best Sheila

Lorna BlakeFebruary 18, 2016 at 5:57 pmReply

Heard this sweet song on CBC radio this afternoon, Feb. 18, 2016. I nearly cried for longing. I too was a little girl from a small town in Alberta–Waskatenau. I had an idyllic childhood, but we moved to Edmonton so I could start Grade 1 with a teacher my parents hoped would be less prejudiced and mean spirited toward some of my classmates. I have had a long and happy life–except for the moments when I long to be that little girl again, in my little town, rolling down the hill (or sleighing down, in winter). Thank you for this lovely song. I hope to be able to print the lyrics to read to my 95-year-old parents, who also left their early past.

My darling husband just said, “Jeez, Lorna, I’m not going to let you listen to the radio anymore if it gets you all emotional like that!”

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